Here's to new levels in 2014.

07 January 2014


Last night, I went down a little rabbit hole on the blog segment of the internet. A photo on Pinterest led to a post on a blog which led to another blog and another, et cetera, et cetera. 

A little known fact about me: I originally wanted to go to school for photography. My senior year of high school was spent stressing about future college plans and simultaneously doing as little schoolwork as possible. I was supposed to write a 100 page script for my final project in film class. It didn't get written. And I spent more time chillin' in teacher's offices than any student who's not in trouble should. As a high school student [in America], they teach you how to solve complex calculus formulas, and they break down the specifics of the War of 1812, but they don't teach you how to manage money or use credit wisely, and then they still expected you to choose a path for your future and know what you want to do for the rest of your life. It's backwards, IMO. Then college students get condemned for switching majors multiple times or taking time off from their studies. Like most people, young adults need time to figure out major life decisions, but that pressure to jump into a collegiate career immediately after graduation, lest you waste your life away, is daunting.

I felt that pressure. Going to college was ingrained in my thought-process from the time I started grade school. I wanted to be everything from a doctor to a lawyer to a photographer. I dropped those first two dreams like a bad habit once I started coming into my own, but photography nestled it's way deep into my heart and held on tight. After researching a couple run-of-the-mill, typical four-year universities, I decided to check out Savannah College of Art and Design, and I even toured the campus. Little did I know, fancy schmancy schools like that require portfolio submissions with their applications, and being raised by a single mother meant we didn't have the expendable funds to buy me a fancy schmancy camera to practice with and pop out some solid material, and the photos from my Kodak EasyShare Point-and-Shoot camera definitely wouldn't've made the cut. That, paired with the "photographers don't always make much money" statements from many people steered me away from pursuing a professional career behind the camera.

Now here I am, almost 10 years later [yikes!], with an English degree. I've come to be very happy with my decision to pursue Creative Writing, and I actually cherish and appreciate my university experience. Things really do happen for a reason. BUT I still drool in awe at beautiful photography, wishing I could create similar art of my own. When I come work that I admire, inspiration wells inside me, hitting the spot like a Thanksgiving meal.

I try to bring the visuals to life through my writing, but sometimes that's super limiting. I can describe a beautiful sunset with all the eloquence and articulation of a thousand Ernest Hemmingways, but actually showing the hues of the horizon and how the light meshes with the sky will always be powerful on a different level.

Hopefully I'll be able to step my game up this year. Here's to new levels in 2014.


11 comments

  1. Anonymous07 January

    Writing is not limited as you think. It's a different art form than visual, but it adds perspective. And to someone who is blind, words are everything. You can still pursue photography...there are a myriad of resources available for you to perfect your craft...and you don't always need the most expensive camera. It's all about the photographer, not the equipment. ♥

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    1. This is very true, but there's a certain aspect to photos taken with high-quality equipment that you just can't capture using basic pieces. Still, I'll see what I can pull out from under my sleeve... *rubs hands together*

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  2. Anonymous07 January

    When I returned back to school that's what I wanted to major in photography since I've been doing it for so long but I also have been taking these adult photography classes and asked a couple of my peers in there what do they think and some did go to school for photography and wish they haven't because they don't teach you everything like you think they would and some of the best photographers are self taught. there are programs, YouTube, etc that can teach you a lot and which I have been using every source as possible lol. if your up for it you'll have to come to one these shoot and greets I go to and meet a lot of photographers they give great advice and just simple fun too lol

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    1. Valla, PLEASE contact me next time you go to one of those. I'd love to tag along!

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  3. I wish you all the best this coming year! I know a lot of great bloggers making beautiful pics just with their iphones or simple digital cameras, so it's really about what you're trying to capture and say with your photography, not what equipment you use. but of course- having great geer alway brings in a lot of motivation :)

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    1. Thank you for the well wishes, Kotryna! I wish you the same.

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  4. I think you can totally achieve new levels in 2014! All my blog photos were done with an iPhone up until I recently got a camera. "Good" photography is subjective to both the photographer and those who later view the resulting pictures. Make it your own and don't get caught up in comparing your material with others. And I totally agree with Chymere in that 'a good camera doesn't necessarily equate to a good photographer". The first step is to pick up your camera (whether it's an iPhone or slr) and start snapping away :) You got this!

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    1. Indeed, this seems to be the general consensus. I'm thinking of a master plan.

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  5. Ohh. I know that feeling of yours.
    I have never studied.. never. Can you believe it? I know - I'm still young, but that's something what I'll always be bit ashamed of.
    Anyways! I wanted to study arts and design. And that didn't happen. I didn't have any support, and any kind of. I was all by myself. But now my life is all based on that. On art, and design. And I'm so glad. :)
    Just never give up. And there will always be some other people who's work will look better for you, but that doesn't mean that yours is bad. Same with the blog - there are so many great and special blogs all around, and trust me - yours is one of those :) I guess we all have something very special.. as we all are unique :)
    And I wish you to have courage and find some time one day for photography. I'm pretty sure that you could make a great photographer ;)
    it all starts from the taste - and yours is great! :)

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  6. Thanks for believing in me, Vaida. Some of my favorite photographers never had any formal training, so I know there's definitely hope!

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  7. Hey Disa, don't discount yourself because of not having professional equipment right now. I shoot all of the photos for my blog with a little Nikon Coolpix & though I don't have the highest quality that I could, just using my camera (almost) every day has helped me to kind of develop a style of my own and to really learn all the features of my camera.I hope to get a dslr sometime in the near future but I know that my point of view & the stories I tell through my photos won't change, just the quality. Practice your craft on whatever equipment you have and when you do get the professional set you want, you'll be that much more prepared for it. If you have this dream in you, nothing can stop you!

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